Porn Could Save the VR Industry

Let’s face it: so far, virtual reality has been a disappointment. It’s 2017, and I’m not surfing the matrix on my fully integrated VR nano-suit. Instead, VR sales have failed to meet almost all analysts’ expectations. According to the research firm Super Data, in 2016 the VR industry only sold 6.3 million devices and took in just $1.8 billion in revenue. Some forecasters were hoping for sales of $5 billion or more.

So why aren’t people buying VR systems? Why aren’t people excited about such a revolutionary technology? What are we missing?

In a word? Porn.

In nine words? High definition, 360 degree, hopefully interactive, virtual reality porn.

A Whatsgoodly survey of 3,809 millennials found that college age students are more excited about VR porn than they are about VR video games or movies. A whopping 40% of people surveyed said that porn is the most exciting use for VR (compared to only 24% for video games).

If you just look at men, those numbers are even more dramatic. 54% of male respondents said that, of all VR options, they are most excited about VR porn. That’s more than twice the number of guys that are most excited about VR video games (only 26%).

A recent Thrive Analytics study determined that the top reason people aren’t buying VR is that they just have no interest. Well, there’s nothing more interesting than sex. And, in this case, there’s no better hook than porn.

Hey VR companies: want to start selling some systems? Embrace porn. Keep age-blockers and implement it tastefully, but make porn easier to access and view. Admit the obvious – millennials are really excited about VR porn. They might even get out their wallets in time for the holiday season.

Whatsgoodly is the largest social polling app for millennials – our Winsights Library contains hundreds of thousands of polls on topics from market research to sex and dating. Want to poll your friends (or learn more about accessing the library)? Follow this link to learn more!

Methodology: Results for this survey were collected from 3,809 US millennials between July 14, 2016, and June 9, 2017. For results based on the total sample of US millennials, the margin of sampling error is ±2 percentage points at the 95% confidence level.

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